Tag Archives: Entrepreneur

The Power Law (Part Four): The First Venture Deal

They were the best and brightest young engineers American could produce. But they had one problem: their boss was a tyrant.

Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory founder William Shockley shouted at his talented engineers, recorded all phone calls, and even demanded they take lie detector tests. All refused.

Instead, they did something few engineers in the 1950’s had ever done: struck out on their own. But how could these men of modest means start a semiconductor company?


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Enter Arthur Rock, perhaps the first venture capitalist. Rock invested and also brought in entrepreneur Sherman Fairchild, who put in a cool $1.5 million.

The “traitorous eight” engineers were off to the races. The company called itself Fairchild Semiconductor.

This was the first modern-style venture capital deal. This fascinating history is recounted in Sebastian Mallaby’s new book, The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future.

Like today, the Fairchild deal involved equity investment. What’s more, the founders and employees continued to own much of the company.

That employee ownership was a critical advantage.

Its engineers interviewed customers about what they needed before building anything. This made sure the new company’s products were useful.

The engineers had a strong incentive to make sure they built products that sold well. Big sales meant their stock went up!

Fairchild prospered, making huge advances in semiconductors and racking up millions in sales. Rock’s investment proved to be a home run.

His first fund went from $3.4 million to $77 million in just 7 years. This 23-fold return would be absolutely off the charts, even today.

What’s striking about the story of Fairchild is how unlikely it was.

The culture of the 1950’s was all about big institutions, from major corporations to the army. Finance was highly conservative, more concerned with avoiding loss than reaching for enormous gains.

Without this new form of investing, the Fairchild engineers would’ve kept laboring miserably for Shockley. Or perhaps they’d have moved to some lumbering bureaucracy with little interest in their ideas.

Either way, they probably wouldn’t have been able to make the huge technical advances they did at Fairchild.

The impact of what some call “liberation capital” has only grown with time.

Just a fraction of 1% of US firms raise venture capital. But that tiny group of companies accounts for 76% of the market value of IPO’s and 89% of R&D spending in America.

The most valuable assets are increasingly intangible. They are not smoke belching factories but lines of code.

This is why the venture industry will only become more important with time. It’s the only one that’s good at financing these intangible assets.

Most other investors are conservative and want collateral young firms don’t have.

When I meet with an ambitious founder today, I sometimes wonder where they’d be without venture capital. Perhaps they’d be toiling away miserably in some large bureaucracy indifferent to their talents.

And I want to free them.

More on tech:

The Power Law (Part Three): Angels and VC’s

The Power Law (Part Two)

The Power Law (Part One)

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Photo: The “traitorous eight” at the Fairchild Semiconductor offices

The Power Law (Part Three): Angels and VC’s

In the world of venture capital, there are two species: great white shark VC’s and goldfish angel investors. They dwarf us in size and power as we wiggle about looking for an insect to eat.

So I was surprised to learn that in some of the hottest deals, angel investors actually have the advantage.


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In his superb new book The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future, Sebastian Mallaby recounts how the greatest tech companies found their first supporters. Time and again, the hottest companies rejected entreaties to meet from the top venture firms.

Instead, they went to angel investors to raise money quickly and easily with a minimum of oversight.

Mark Zuckerberg refused to meet with Accel early on. He even showed up at the offices of heavyweight Sequoia Capital in his pajamas!

Sequoia founder Don Valentine recognized the stunt for what it was: a provocation. Zuckerberg wanted the princes of Sand Hill Road to know he didn’t need them.

Instead, he turned to Peter Thiel and other angels for his first funding. Unlike the slow moving investment committees of venture firms, they could write a check on the spot.

But Zuckerberg was not the first great entrepreneur to shun VC’s. Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin had every firm in the Valley breathing down their necks.

Instead, they met angel Andy Bechtolsheim on their front porch.

After a brief pitch, Betcholsheim raced back to his Porsche and returned with a checkbook. He invested $100,000 when the company wasn’t even incorporated.

Along with angels, lesser known venture firms also back many of the greatest companies. As Mallaby notes:

“…the idea that venture capitalists get into deals on the strength of their brands can be exaggerated. A deal seen by a partner at Sequoia will also be seen by rivals at other firms: in a fragmented cottage industry, there is no lack of competition. Often, winning the deal depends on skill as much as brand: it’s about understanding the business model well enough to impress entrepreneurs; it’s about judging what valuation might be reasonable. One careful tally concluded that new or emerging venture partnerships capture around half the gains in the top deals, and there are myriad examples of famous VC’s having a chance to invest and then flubbing it.”

I was very surprised to learn that being at a top firm isn’t the advantage it may seem. No wonder Sequoia still cold messages founders!

In this competitive environment, I look for ways for us to cooperate.

VC’s can benefit if angels bring them great early stage deals. Angels benefit by being able to help their portfolio companies.

In the end, if we can work together to build the greatest companies of the future, everybody wins!

What are your experiences raising from angels and VC’s? Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

More on tech:

The Power Law (Part Two)

The Power Law (Part One)

Managing a Crisis the Sequoia Way

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Photo: Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. “File:Google page brin.jpg” by Ehud Kenan is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

The Power Law (Part Two)

“When in doubt, take the shot.”

Doug Leone, Managing Partner, Sequoia Capital

The partners from prestigious venture firm Accel stood outside an office in Palo Alto, waiting to take theirs.

These were the offices of a young startup called thefacebook.

Most startups would’ve killed to meet them. But thefacebook’s young founder gave the Accel partners the cold shoulder.


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This didn’t stop them. They lurked outside and buttonholed any thefacebook employee they could find.

Eventually, they got the meeting with founder Mark Zuckerberg. And they won the deal, a $10 million check into the company’s Series A round.

To this day, it remains one of the greatest investments in the history of venture capital.

As an angel investor, I always assumed that the prestigious firms like Accel or Sequoia had it easy. The best founders must be falling all over themselves to meet them!

Nothing could be further from the truth. As Sebastian Mallaby chronicles in his superb new book The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future, the greatest firms are also the scrappiest.

Sequoia Capital, perhaps the greatest VC firm in history, wrote their own code to find the most downloaded new iOS apps. One day, it flagged a small program called WhatsApp.

Sequoia partner Jim Goetz sent e-mail after e-mail to WhatsApp’s founder. For months, he never heard a word.

Finally, Goetz was able to get a meeting with WhatsApp’s founder, Jan Koum. In time, Sequoia won the deal.

The investment made Sequoia $3 billion, and WhatsApp is now ubiquitous throughout the world.

So what does this mean for small fries like me?

Even the greatest have to vigorously pursue deals and handle rejection, so don’t give up on an awesome company! If Sequoia isn’t too cool to cold-message a founder on LinkedIn (psst: they’re not), neither am I!

And when I find that rare, incredible startup, I’ll be repeating Leone’s words to myself: “take the shot.”

More on tech:

The Power Law (Part One)

Managing a Crisis the Sequoia Way

Talking Startups and Today’s Fundraising Pullback

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Photo: Doug Leone, Managing Partner, Sequoia Capital. “_SJP1148” by TechCrunch is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

The Power Law (Part One)

“Reasonable people…routinely fail in life’s important missions by not even attempting them.”

The Power Law

Every day for the last 15 months, I’ve sat down in front of my computer and tried to find the next great tech company. Being immersed in the daily details of e-mails and deal memos made me wonder about the history of this most unusual of industries, venture capital.


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So I grabbed a copy of Sebastian Mallaby’s excellent new book The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future. Mallaby traces the history of venture capital from its first deal to today, and explores the principles that drive its success.

The fundamental principle of venture capital is the power law — a small percentage of winners generate almost all the returns:

“Anytime you have outliers whose success multiplies success, you leave the domain of the normal distribution for the land ruled by the power law — from a world in which things vary slightly to one of extreme contrasts. And once you cross that perilous frontier, you better begin to think differently.”

Since just a few companies drive most of the returns, the entire business becomes about finding and investing in those very few companies:

“…each year brings a handful of outliers that hit the proverbial grand slam, and the only thing that matters in venture is to own a piece of them.”

So how should investors identify those rare businesses? Arthur Rock, who was arguably the first venture capitalist, liked to ask open-ended questions like “Who do you admire?” or “What mistakes have you learned from?”

Rock looked for founders who were realistic and determined. He avoided those who were prone to wishful thinking or who tried to please instead of being honest.

Rock’s inquisitive style led him to back Fairchild Semiconductor in the 1950’s in what was the first modern-style venture capital deal.

Founder traits are important, but hard numbers also matter. Google, eBay, Facebook and YouTube all had staggering growth figures early on.

Andy Rachleff, Benchmark partner and early investor in eBay, looks at an even more sophisticated growth metric:

“‘When companies grow exponentially, they don’t suddenly stop,’ Andy Rachleff observed later, adding that it is the ‘second derivative —the changes in the rate of growth of a company’s sales — that really tell a venture investor whether to back it.’”

Once an investor finds that diamond in the rough, he needs to own a piece, even if the price is high. Mallaby notes that Google’s seed round valuation was around $10M, high for its time.

Prone as I am to analysis, I often undervalued actually meeting investors and founders. This book taught me a lot about the importance of networking to the venture industry.

Don Valentine, founder of Sequoia, went to a Silicon Valley bar every Wednesday and Friday to chat with engineers about the next big thing. In the world of startups, investors are the specialists in connecting people with each other.

The more interesting people we meet, the better we’ll be at our job!

Mallaby provides so much great information that I’ll save the rest of the book for another post soon. In the mean time, if you’re interested in startups and venture capital, I urge you to grab yourself a copy!

More on tech:

What I Learned From an Investor Who Turned $100,000 into $100,000,000

Amp It Up

Managing a Crisis the Sequoia Way

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Managing a Crisis the Sequoia Way

Control what you can control. Be steady but decisive. And most importantly, build a sustainable business where you are in control of your destiny.

Roelof Botha, Sequoia Capital



Lately, I’ve been seeing something I’ve never seen before in the eyes of some of the founders I meet: desperation.


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Fundraising is increasingly difficult, tech has gotten crushed and the economy is almost surely in recession. Companies that were doing great just a few months ago are staring death in the face.

With that in mind, I spent this afternoon digging into Sequoia Capital’s recent presentation on what the downturn means for startups.

It offers the best advice available for startups navigating this difficult market. Sequoia’s partners advise startups to be prepared to cut back to ensure survival, if necessary.

If your runway (time until you run out of money) is getting short, you may have to make painful cuts in spending.

Do the cut exercise (projects, R&D, marketing, other expenses). It doesn’t mean you have to pull the trigger, but that you are ready to do it in the next 30 days if needed.

Doug Leone, Sequoia Capital

Sequoia also emphasizes that this crisis offers many opportunities. Many companies are more focused once they cut back and hunker down for a bear market.

What’s more, recruiting, which has been extremely difficult for many startups, is about to get much easier. As Leone notes, all of the FANG companies have hiring freezes.

This means startups can have their pick of the best possible people.

Even better yet, some of your competitors are about to go out of business! But if you carefully manage cash, you’ll survive and have a chance to dominate your market.

Look at this as a time of incredible opportunity. You play your cards right and you will come out as a strong entity.

Roelof Botha

This downturn doesn’t mean that you have to stop growing. But it may mean paring back side projects to focus like a laser on driving efficient growth in your core business.

You can still sign up customers in a downturn if you have a strong value proposition. Since I mostly invest in SaaS, I found this passage on proving value to business customers especially helpful:

Three reasons why people buy regardless of market conditions (enterprise POV):

● Drive growth

● Save money (real, hard ROI)

● Reduce risk

● Everything else is fluffy “

Carl Eschenbach, Partner, Sequoia Capital

Finally, it’s important to remain hopeful even if things get hard!

“Whatever we are facing today, it can’t be any worse than the uncertainty we faced at the beginning of the pandemic. We will prevail.”

Alfred Lin, Partner, Sequoia Capital

You created your company for a reason. You have a mission to fulfill.

A downturn doesn’t change that. You just have to manage it correctly and seize the opportunity it presents.

The very best of luck to all you brave founders!

What challenges are you seeing in startupland today? Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

More on tech:

TALKING STARTUPS AND TODAY’S FUNDRAISING PULLBACK

TALKING ABOUT TODAY’S STARTUP MARKET ON THE ACCELERATOR PODCAST

THE BURN MULTIPLE: WHAT IS IT, AND WHAT CAN IT DO FOR YOU?

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Photo: “Sequoia Capital” by isriya is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.

Talking Startups and Today’s Fundraising Pullback

Hey everyone! 👋 Hope your Monday is going great.

I gave a talk at the Starta Accelerator in NYC last week. It was a lot of fun!

I talk about how the venture capital market works, my investing approach, and today’s pullback in fundraising. And a lot more!

Here are some interesting parts:

9:06: When I invest without traction, and David Sack’s latest startup, Callin.

20:01: How long I take to make a decision to invest

23:11: Why Jason Calacanis’s syndicate is the best one out there

29:07: Fundraising in a tougher environment for startups

34:09: Conspiracy theories on Peloton and Sex and the City’s Mr. Big. 🙂

41:02: Why investors BS you

45:21: How I help the startups I invest in

52:37: Jason’s book Angel and other great books on venture capital and startups

59:00: Why single founders are sometimes ruled out by investors, and why they shouldn’t be.

What information here was most useful to you? What did I miss?

Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

Have a great week!

More on tech:

Why Investors BS You

Inside Today’s Early Stage Venture Market

The Burn Multiple: What Is It, and What Can It Do for You?

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Fundrise

This platform lets me diversify my real estate investments so I’m not too exposed to any one market. I’ve invested since 2018 with great returns.

More on Fundrise in this post.

If you decide to invest in Fundrise, you can use this link to get $100 in free bonus shares!

Misfits Market

I’ve used Misfits for years, and it never disappoints! Every fruit and vegetable is organic, super fresh, and packed with flavor!

I wrote a detailed review of Misfits here.

Use this link to sign up and you’ll save $15 on your first order. 

Why Investors BS You

Ever had a conversation like this?

Investor: This is an incredible concept! You guys are going to change the world!

You: Thank you so much! So, how much do you want to invest?

Investor: Well, actually, I couldn’t get my partners there. But you guys are going to do great! Keep me posted and let me know how I can be helpful.

You: *Scratches head*

We investors ply startup founders with big smiles and happy talk. Star fruit, anyone?

Many founders hear nothing but compliments but come away without a check. Why do investors do this?

As someone who nodded and smiled at founders for a good long while, allow me to pull back the curtain…

Preserving Optionality

Or in plain English, “keeping your options open.”

Maybe an investor thinks that a startup they meet with is not going to make it. But they could always be wrong.

Really wrong.

If the company takes off in a major way, the VC may find himself begging to get into the Series A when he missed the seed round. And if that happens, he doesn’t want the founder angry at him because he was too candid at a meeting 2 years ago.

Reputation

As an angel investor or VC, your reputation is everything.

If I tell a founder the hard truth that his company is burning too much money and may go out of business, he might accept that as constructive criticism. But he might also get very upset with me.

Founders talk to each other. If that entrepreneur tells two dozen others that I’m a jerk, there goes my deal flow.

It is in the interests of the founder for the investor to be honest. It can help the founder improve her pitch or fix issues in her business.

But it’s not in the investor’s interest! He’s more interested in avoiding a hit to his reputation than in helping a struggling founder.

Tell Them Why Their Baby’s Ugly

After hearing complaints about happy-talking investors from some of the best founders I know, I’ve changed my approach. When I’m not interested in their company at this time, I’ve started trying to tell founders in a direct but polite way.

I also try to explain why they don’t meet my criteria for investment and how they might meet it in the future. As noted angel investor Zach Coelius said, “You have to tell them why their baby’s ugly.”

The Time for Honesty Is Now

Being honest with founders is especially important right now. The fundraising environment has gotten a lot worse for startups in the last few months.

Many startups will not survive this. If giving a founder some constructive criticism prevents a business from dying and a bunch of people from losing their jobs, that’s a risk we investors need to take.

We have to remember why we’re really here: to build the ecosystem and help new companies grow and thrive.

Please remember this when an investor gives you constructive criticism: she’s actually taking a risk she doesn’t really have to take. Whatever decision you make, at least consider the investor’s ideas.

What frustrates you about dealing with investors? Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

Have a great weekend everyone! 👋

More on tech:

The Burn Multiple: What Is It, and What Can It Do for You?

Inside Today’s Early Stage Venture Market

What the Best Founders I Know Have in Common

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This platform lets me diversify my real estate investments so I’m not too exposed to any one market. I’ve invested since 2018 with great returns.

More on Fundrise in this post.

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Misfits Market

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The Burn Multiple: What Is It, and What Can It Do for You?

Today, I want to talk to you about a startup metric you don’t hear much about: the burn multiple. The burn multiple measures how efficiently you’re using your cash to drive growth.

This number is more important now than it’s been in many years. We are in a more difficult fundraising environment and investors are heavily scrutinizing how companies use cash.

In the boom times we’ve had for the last couple years, high growth startups could get funded no matter how inefficiently they spent. Shoot, even startups with no revenue or product often raised big rounds!

Those days are over.

The NASDAQ is in a bear market, late stage funding is down, and investors are asking themselves not just “Who will thrive?” but “Who will survive?”

The startups that make it will be those who know how to use money to efficiently drive growth.

So now that you know why the burn multiple matters, how do you actually calculate it?

It’s pretty simple. For any period (usually a quarter or a year), divide burn (losses) by new revenue added in that period.

Burn Multiple:

Net Burn / Net New Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR)

Your burn multiple calculation should account for the length of your sales cycle.

If it takes you around 2-3 months to close a new customer, it’s appropriate to compare burn in Q4 2021 to new ARR in Q1 2022, for example. If your sales cycle is 6 months, compare Q3 2021 to Q1 2022.


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Now you know what your burn multiple is. But how can you tell if it’s good or bad?

Use these benchmarks from a superb post by David Sacks, one of the leading SaaS entrepreneurs and investors:

Burn multiple is especially relevant for SaaS companies with their sticky revenue. Burning cash to get lots of revenue that sticks around makes sense.

But the burn multiple is still quite relevant for all startups. It helps you understand if the cash you’re burning is actually building your business.

I recently saw a deal memo for a company that had burned about $1.1 million in a quarter to add just $80,000 of new ARR. That’s a burn multiple of 14.

A burn multiple like that is an emergency!

So let’s say you’re that company. What should you do?

Get that burn down right away! If you can’t show cash efficient growth, it’s going to be hard to raise money right now.

You’ll want to extend your runway (time before you run out of money) as much as possible. This gives you time to figure out the issues in your business before the cash runs out.

Another advantage of knowing your burn multiple is that you can share it proactively with prospective investors. Especially if you’re a seed stage company, your awareness of this important metric alone will impress investors.

Of course, you’ll impress them even more if you can show a good burn multiple!

I’m writing this because I want to see your company survive and even flourish! But we won’t get there with happy talk alone.

Calculate your burn multiple regularly and act when it gets out of line.

What issues are you seeing in today’s fundraising environment? Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

More on tech:

Inside Today’s Early Stage Venture Market

What the Best Founders I Know Have in Common

The Startup Pitch Checklist

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This platform lets me diversify my real estate investments so I’m not too exposed to any one market. I’ve invested since 2018 with great returns.

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Use this link to sign up and you’ll save $15 on your first order. 

Venture Capitalists Don’t Invest in Ideas

A few months back, a very nice young lady contacted me. She had an idea for a software product and wanted me to hear it.

I had to think of a very polite way of explaining that…

Venture Capitalists Don’t Invest in Ideas.

Many people think that angels and VC’s spend their days evaluating ideas. When they find an interesting and original concept, they shake hands and write a big check.

This isn’t how it works.

There are countless ideas, but only a skilled and determined founder can turn her concept into a real product. And then it takes even more perseverance to find customers who need the product and get their money.


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Traction Over Everything

So rather than attempting to read the tea leaves and find out which idea will work, most investors look for evidence that it’s already working. That evidence is called “traction.”

If you have several thousand dollars a month in revenue coming in the door, growing 30% month over month, there is clearly a very strong demand for your product. You’ve proven its value in the market.

If you can show an investor traction like that rather than just a deck or even an MVP, your odds of getting funded skyrocket.

Why are investors so stingy? Because they know that most startups will never even get to dollar 1 of revenue.

If investors dump cash on too many companies that don’t succeed in the market, they will soon have no more money left to invest. And then, even the best startups won’t be able to raise capital.

Venture Capital Is to Help You Scale, Not to Help You Start

Venture capital is really for scaling a business, not starting one. If you clearly have strong demand for your product in the market, we can help you staff up and meet that demand.

But few investors, if any, want to give you money to build a product.

What we’re trying to avoid is a team that raises money, works on the product, but misses their launch date. The date is postponed, and they miss it again.

Soon, they’re back asking for more money with no real progress to show.

But What About Pre-Seed?

Even for pre-seed deals, most investors want to see a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) built. Without that, it’s difficult to tell what you’re even investing in.

It’s also hard to say if the founders will ever be able to deliver on their plans.

Even the Best Bring More Than an Idea

Last year, I got a deal memo in my inbox for Callin, a social audio app co-founded by David Sacks.

Sacks is part of the famed PayPal Mafia and served as the company’s COO. After that, he founded Yammer and sold it to Microsoft for $1.2 billion in 2012.

He has a stronger track record than almost anyone. But even he didn’t show up with just an idea.

Sacks and his team had a nicely functioning app in private beta available for iOS. Numerous users were already creating podcasts on the platform.

Alas, the round was massively oversubscribed and I never got my allocation. But I did come away with an interesting lesson.

Wrap-Up

If you want to raise money, show up with more than an idea. Show up with an MVP you can show investors.

Better yet, come with a couple of customers and a little money coming in the door. Nothing impresses investors like real customers and real revenue.

Building an MVP with minimal resources and finding customers on your own is very hard. But so is contacting investor after investor with little chance of success.

What misconceptions have you seen about fundraising? What still mystifies you about the process?

Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

Have a wonderful weekend everyone! 👋

More on tech:

Inside Today’s Early Stage Venture Market

What the Best Founders I Know Have in Common

Amp It Up

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Inside Today’s Early Stage Venture Market

The good times are over. And they didn’t even last that long.

The NASDAQ quickly bounced back from an over 30% fall in early 2020 as COVID raged. The tech stock index reached all-time highs last November, only to plummet a further 29% since.

Now, the tech stock rout is making its way into private markets. So what does this mean for early stage startups and angel investors like me who fund them?

Here’s what I see going on inside today’s market:

1) Deals are taking longer to close. A deal that might have closed in 1-2 months last year is taking 3-4 months now.

2) Valuations are down moderately. I am seeing declines of around 10-20% from the 2021 peak.

Publicly released numbers show less of a correction, but remember that there is often a several month lag between when a deal is priced and when it’s publicly announced. If valuations drop, it won’t be apparent to the general public until months after it happened.

3) High growth companies are still getting plenty of funding.

Seed stage and Series A startups that are growing revenue rapidly, in the range of 10-20% month over month or more, are raising almost as before. These are the strongest startups, and in a tougher market, investors will gravitate toward them.


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4) Some investors are increasing their pace of capital deployment.

I’ve actually invested a bit more than usual in the last two months as valuations have retreated. If you can invest in great companies for less than you could 6 months ago, you may want to deploy more cash than usual.

5) Crypto/NFT projects continue to command crazy valuations.

Bitcoin has fallen by more than half since November. NFT trading volumes on major exchange OpenSea are also down more than 50% since the beginning of this year.

Yet this, the most rah-rah of all venture sectors, seems to be going full speed ahead. I still see extremely expensive rounds in blockchain companies that have few if any customers and often not even a launched product.

The NFT area seems the most overheated of all. I recently saw a $1 billion valuation for an early stage NFT company.

It not only didn’t have a product yet, it didn’t even have a deck.

I expect a brutal correction in these markets in the coming months, leaving behind only the most useful and widely adopted projects.


In all, if startups focus on good, cash-efficient growth, I’m confident they’ll still find the funding they need in today’s market. But companies with no revenue, no product in market, heavy burn, and/or anemic growth are in trouble.

What are you guys seeing in early stage venture markets? And what do you think the future holds?

Leave a comment at the bottom and let me know!

More on tech:

What the Best Founders I Know Have in Common

Amp It Up

The Startup Pitch Checklist

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Photo: “2016/366/238 Proceed with Caution” by Edna Winti is marked with CC BY 2.0.

If you found this post interesting, please share it on Reddit/Twitter/etc. This helps more people find the blog! 

Save Money on Stuff I Use:

Fundrise

This platform lets me diversify my real estate investments so I’m not too exposed to any one market. I’ve invested since 2018 with great returns.

More on Fundrise in this post.

If you decide to invest in Fundrise, you can use this link to get $100 in free bonus shares!

Misfits Market

I’ve used Misfits for years, and it never disappoints! Every fruit and vegetable is organic, super fresh, and packed with flavor!

I wrote a detailed review of Misfits here.

Use this link to sign up and you’ll save $15 on your first order. 

If you found this post interesting, please share it on Reddit/Twitter/etc. This helps more people find the blog! 

Save Money on Stuff I Use:

Fundrise

This platform lets me diversify my real estate investments so I’m not too exposed to any one market. I’ve invested since 2018 with great returns.

More on Fundrise in this post.

If you decide to invest in Fundrise, you can use this link to get $100 in free bonus shares!

Misfits Market

I’ve used Misfits for years, and it never disappoints! Every fruit and vegetable is organic, super fresh, and packed with flavor!

I wrote a detailed review of Misfits here.

Use this link to sign up and you’ll save $15 on your first order.