Tag Archives: MIT

Machine Learning Engine Predicts 20% Rally in AMC in Next Month

I came across a fascinating little tool today. It’s a machine learning program designed to forecast returns in stocks.

It’s called the Trefis AI Engine and it draws from 8 years of past stock returns.

Given the intense interest in stock of AMC Entertainment Holdings, Inc., I had to see what the oracle would say.

AMC is up 34% in the last month. Based on past scenarios, what does the next month have in store?

The machine learning engine predicts a 20% return over the next month in this scenario.

Machine learning is a series of algorithms that can be used to identify patterns and make predictions. It powers Google search, Netflix recommendations, and even self driving cars.

Will the genie be right? I honestly don’t know. But I find the tool an interesting thing to play with.

Type in some scenarios of your own and let me know what you find in the comments at the very bottom of the page!

Kudos to Forbes for the tip.

More on AMC:

New Data: AMC Fails to Deliver Down 85%

What a Hedge Fund King Fears Most

For Retail Traders, AMC Has Become the Only Meme Stock

Photo: “DSC_0274” by oblomberg is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

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I Just Went to a Lecture at the World’s Premier Genomics Institute. Here’s What I Learned.

This little guy has superpowers.

I just attended a fascinating talk from the Broad Institute at MIT on how the genomes of other species relate to our DNA as humans. Drs. Elinor Karlsson and Diane Genereux of the Broad Institute are intensively studying other mammals, working to uncover the genetic basis of their superpowers.

For example, the thirteen lined ground squirrel can hibernate, the teeth of the North American beaver include iron and are thus nearly indestructible, and the Jamaican fruit bat can eat all the sweets it wants without diabetes. What if we humans could do those things?

Any such applications are a long ways away, if ever, but learning about these incredible animals was definitely interesting.

Karlsson and her colleagues have sequenced the genomes of 240 species. Some spots on those genomes change little if at all, indicating they probably have a crucial function that can’t be changed. Others change faster than the normal rate of mutations, indicating a survival advantage to mutations in that area.

The researchers also noted that in the 100 million years since all mammals shared a common ancestor, every possible genetic mutation has been tried, given the base rate of random mutations. So, if we don’t see a mutation in living mammals, it probably was tried and failed. Dr. Karlsson likened this to nature’s clinical trial, an excellent analogy.

This genomic research is likely to have more and more applications because the cost of sequencing a human genome has dropped from $2.7 billion for the first one to under $1,000 now. The Broad Institute sequences one every 10 minutes.

This is an explosion of data similar to the development of the internet. It took years, but companies like Google came along and harnessed that data, with profound effects on society. I anticipate enormous advances will come from this research in the future.

If you want to watch the lecture in its entirety, it should be up on the Broad’s YouTube channel soon. And to register for future lectures like this, check out the Science for All Seasons website here.

Thanks to Drs. Karlsson and Genereux, moderator Tom Ulrich, and the Broad Institute for this awesome talk!

An Outstanding Science Movie and Your Chance to Talk to a Nobel Prize Winner

I just finished watching the superb documentary Human Nature, which details the origins and applications of CRISPR gene editing. The filmmakers interview all the leading people in the field and produce a fascinating and highly accessible narrative.

I found particularly striking how one of the co-inventors of CRISPR, Jennifer Doudna, enjoyed being in an unknown field at first but also wondered whether the field was neglected because it was a dead end. It shows us what we can accomplish when we overcome our self-doubt!

You can see the movie and attend a talk tomorrow at 1pm EST with Nobel Laureate Jennifer Doudna here, both free of charge. It’s not often a person gets the chance to ask questions of a Nobel prize winner. I’ll be there!

P.S. If you’re interested in CRISPR, I recommend this book.)

“Micah’s DNA” by micahb37 is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0